Starry Eyed Startup Aims To Deliver Gigabit Wireless Internet

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

A well funded startup company Starry decloaked today - announcing plans to build a "radical new Internet service" promising wireless speeds of up to a gigabit per second, with no contracts, usage limits, or data caps of any sort.

It sounds miraculous - and the high-frequency wireless technology that Starry is pioneering is indeed pretty awesome stuff.

But before you get too excited...

Starry is NOT at all appropriate for RVers who are mobile in any fashion.

Starry Point is Point to Point

The awkwardly shaped Starry Point receiver is designed to sit in a traditional window, with the antenna on the outside and the core electronics indoors. This design will never fit with most RV windows.

The awkwardly shaped Starry Point receiver is designed to sit in the base of a traditional home window, with the antenna (right) on the outside and the core electronics indoors. This design will never work with most RV windows.

Starry is NOT a new cellular service that supports devices in motion, or even wide area coverage.

It is rather a next-generation fixed wireless service, more commonly known as a WISP (wireless Internet Service Provider), where a central base station beams signals directly to fixed directional antennas mounted on the homes of customers receiving service.

Traditional WISPs usually require professional installation to carefully aim and calibrate the receiving antennas, and offer speeds only a fraction of the gigabit performance Starry is promising.

Starry on the other hand aims to offer customers a smart "Starry Point" receiver that can be self-installed in a window, with internal electronics that can tune in optimal signals without precise aiming.

But...

Though professional installation will not be required, you still need to have line of sight between the "Starry Beam" base station installed on the roof of a nearby building (maximum range seems to be one mile or so) and the "Starry Point" located in a  window in your home.

Any obstructions at all will block the high-frequency millimeter wave signals Starry is using - walls, buildings, trees, or even a pane of glass. Potentially even a heavy rainstorm could knock the Internet offline.

And if you relocate to someplace else - you will no longer have service at all unless you are within sight of another Starry Beam base station.

In other words - WISPs and mobility are not generally compatible.

Getting Starry - Costs & Availability

The Starry Station hotspot was also announced today - but it actually has nothing to do with the Starry Internet service. The Station is just a fancy touch-screen Wi-Fi hotspot that can work with a Starry Point, or any other cable or DSL modem.

The $350 Starry Station hotspot was also announced today - but it actually has nothing to do with the Starry Internet service. The Station is just a fancy touch-screen Wi-Fi hotspot that can work with a Starry Point, or with any other cable or DSL modem. The Starry Station is not required to get a Starry Point and Starry Internet service.

Starry has not revealed any pricing information for the Starry Internet service yet, other than to say that it intends to substantially undercut entrenched cabled internet providers.

Starry Internet will be launching initially only in the Boston area in the summer of 2016, with other cities slated to come later - with an eventual goal of nationwide service.

But even once Starry comes to a town or a city near you - service availability will depend on what roofs have Starry Beam base stations installed, and whether or not you have a window facing in the right direction.

Expect Starry to focus on serving core urban areas with lots of potential customers, with suburban and rural areas unlikely to get service initially - if at all.

In other words - it will be a rare RVer that will be in just the right place to be able to take advantage of Starry Internet. And finding a way to take advantage of Starry will only make sense for people who are staying in a location for an extended period of time.

But...  I can imagine a future where some RV Parks might be able to take advantage of Starry to provide a faster backhaul for their own local Wi-Fi networks.

We all can agree - the more options for fast affordable internet available, the better.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail
Tagged:Tags:

Members, Please Log In to Comment on this Article.


RVMobileInternet.com is a Member Supported Resource

Appreciate content like this article? It is brought to you by the generosity of our premium members - who fund the creation of our content. There is no way we could not put this much time & attention on this topic without their support, and we are so grateful.

You can help keep the articles & resources coming!

Support This Resource Center - Become a Member!

or... Leave a Contribution!


As full time RVers ourselves, we are passionate about mobile technology and our goal is to help YOU have the most current and up to date information to keep connected... so you can concentrate on what drives you!

We appreciate your support by joining, contributing or just sharing our content if you find it helpful. Thanks!